Why Do We Need Fiber?

Fiber is one of the key reasons why whole vegetable food is better for you. Recent data shows that sufficient consumption of fiber can support digestion and lower the risk of chronic disease. Many of those benefits are regulated by the million bacteria in your digestive system, the intestinal microbiota. All fiber is not equal, however. Every kind has different effects on health.

Simply put, dietary fibers are a protein that does not digest in foods. It is divided into two broad categories because of its water solubility. 

Soluble Fiber: Dissolve in liquid and “healthy” bacteria in the intestine may be metabolized.

Insoluble Fiber: Cannot be dissolved in water and it is generally hard on your gut.

There are several distinct fiber categories, it is important to keep in mind. Some have significant health implications, while others are completely irrational. Also, there is a lot of crossover among soluble and insoluble fibers. The good bacteria in the intestine can digest certain insoluble fibers and most foods contain both soluble and insoluble fiber.

Let us see some of the major benefits of adding fiber to the diet.

Helps In Weight Loss

Some fibers, by reducing your appetite, can help you lose weight. Dietary fibers can cause loss of weight by decreasing calorie consumption automatically. Fiber can absorb water into the intestine, slow nutrient absorption and increase feelings of completeness. It relies, however, on the fiber type. Along with certain soluble fibers, certain forms have no impact on weight.

Helps in Regulating Blood Sugar Levels

Foods with high fiber have a lower glycemic index than processed food sources that most of their fiber has been extracted. This is the only feature of high-viscosity, soluble fibers. Inside your food containing carbohydrates, the viscous, soluble fibers can cause small blood sugar spikes.

Controls Cholesterol Level

This is not one of the biggest advantages of consuming fiber but controlling the cholesterol level in your body is one of the crucial things for every individual and fiber does it to some extent. Total cholesterol has decreased by only 1.7 mg/dl and LDL by 2.2 mg/dl on average, eating 2–10 grams of soluble fiber per day. Nevertheless, this also relies on fiber viscosity. Several studies have found remarkable cholesterol decreases in the amount of fiber that has increased.

A Control Over Constipation

Reduced constipation is one of the biggest advantages of increased fiber intake. Fiber is said to lead to water absorption, to increase the volume of your poop and to improve your crap flow through the intestine. Soluble fibers that produce a gel in the digestive tract and do not ferment with intestinal bacteria also work efficiently. Insoluble fibers may not work in decreasing constipation.

However, many people are advised by the doctors or physicians to take a low residue or a low fiber diet for some time due to some intestinal issues os some surgery in the stomach. These people should stay away from fiber items for some time as guided by their doctor and consume only if their doctor allows them to. This is just a phase when you will be consuming low fiber or no fiber at all for some time but you will eventually get back to your normal diet after your recovery. Do not try this type of diet without prior approval from your doctor.

To know more about this diet you can try Visiting Lowresiduediet.net to clear your queries and to know what food items to avoid on this type of diet.

Leave a Reply